Dawson City International Short Film Festival 2015

All the Time in the World Opens DCISFF

Filmmaker Suzanne Crocker addresses the audience prior to the screening of All the Time in the World to kick off the 16th Dawson City International Short Film Festival.

Filmmaker Suzanne Crocker addresses the audience prior to the screening of All the Time in the World to kick off the 16th Dawson City International Short Film Festival.

It was arguably the most anticipated film ever in the Dawson City International Short Film Festival‘s 16-year history. Suzanne Crocker’s documentary All the Time in the World has been showing at film festivals across the world, earning accolades and awards, and all the while has been the talk of the town in Dawson. Last night the movie finally came home to kick off the film festival, playing to two sold-out audiences.

Before the first screening, Crocker told the packed house that this was really their film, since not only does Dawson feature in the documentary, but it was here she began her career as a filmmaker. She thanked the town for its unflagging support and encouragement of the project, even though, as she noted, it meant giving up the services of two family physicians.

All the Time in the World chronicles how Crocker’s family – three young children, ages 10, 8 and 4, her and her husband, two cats, and a dog – leave the comforts of home to live remotely in the Yukon wilderness during the long northern winter and amidst the surprises that the rawness of nature provide. They spend nine months living in a small cabin with no road access, no electricity, no running water, and no internet, no TV, no phone and, most importantly, no clocks or watches.

Filmed over 9 months, off the grid, without external crew, and featuring the unique perspectives of children, All The Time in the World explores the theme of disconnecting from our hectic and technology-laden lives in order to reconnect with each other, ourselves, and our natural environment.

DCAS President Peter Menzies models a ball cap with the DCISFF's new logo.

DCAS President Peter Menzies models a ball cap with the DCISFF’s new logo.

The reception from the Dawson audience was enthusiastic, garnering a standing ovation. At a question-and-answer session afterwards featuring the whole Crocker clan, Suzanne and the others answered queries about some of the logistics about living and filmmaking in the bush that were not depicted in the film. It is different, as she pointed out, talking about this lifestyle to Dawsonites, who understand and relish it, versus urban dwellers in the south who are shocked at the notion of such an isolated and gadget-free existence.

Prior to the screening, festival director Dan Sokolowski thanked the sponsors whose support is so crucial to the event’s ongoing success. He was followed by Dawson City Arts Society (DCAS) President Peter Menzies, who welcomed the audience and explained how important and integrated a role culture plays in northern society. He also announced some major news – a boost in funding for KIAC from the territorial government.

Danny Dowhal, Writer-at-Large

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